Haas Automation Europe Moves into New $5-Million Headquarters

Haas Automation Europe, the European arm of US machine tool builder Haas Automation Inc., has relocated to its new 3,500-m² headquarters and showroom in Zavantem, Belgium, just 10 minutes from the Brussels airport.

The move, which was substantially completed during the first two weeks of May, comes only three years after the company first opened its European operations at Brussels’ Paespsem Business Park. Since then, Haas’s business in Europe has increased dramatically, and the company has outgrown its original location.

In addition to providing expanded office space, the €4-million ($5-million) new building incorporates a 750-m² showroom, allowing some 25 Haas machines from the company’s extensive and growing range of CNC machine tools to be exhibited and demonstrated simultaneously.

As Haas Europe Managing Director Peter Hall puts it, the relocation marks an important milestone for the company.

“Since establishing Haas Europe we’ve exceeded our annual sales targets in all of the key European markets,” Hall says. “In the past year alone, we’ve experienced a sales increase of more than 80%. This is in line with the growth Haas has enjoyed in other markets around the world, and reflects the universal appeal of low-cost, high-quality CNC machines.”

The new headquarters also includes a massive, comprehensive spare parts warehouse run by factory certified support personnel, which will provide same-day dispatch for more than 90% of requisitions, and dispatch 100% of requisitions within 24 hours. The new facility also includes a modern, fully equipped training area and classroom where Haas personnel will instruct Haas service engineers and customers from all over the Continent.

“As both our European customer base and our distributor network increase, we intend to offer the best service and support in the industry,” Hall says. “Our investment in the new office and showroom will help ensure we do just that.”

Haas Automation Europe handles the European operations of Haas Automation Inc., the largest machine tool manufacturer in the United States, which is headquartered in California.

Union Tool Europe Appoints New Distributor for Netherlands

One of the world’s major manufacturers of end mills for the mold and die industry, Union Tool Europe SA of Neuchâtel, Switzerland, has appointed SVM Freestechniek of Valkenswaard, Netherlands, as its new distributor for the Dutch market.

SVM is owned by Hans Smits, who has many years of experience in CNC high-speed machining.

“SVM has a complementary portfolio of products,” says Smits. “The addition of the Union Tool end mill range fits perfectly into this. This complete solution strategy and experience we offer will be invaluable in launching this new partnership, offering the support and service demanded by new and existing customers and helping them with hardmilling.”

SVM has already started building up its stock so that it can offer fast deliveries from its facilities, with back-up supplies from Union Tool’s main European supply base in Switzerland. This will ensure continuity and reliability for all users.

The agreement was made official at the EuroMold show in Frankfurt this past December.

Annual Report Puts RP Industry Under the Microscope

A worldwide progress report on the rapid prototyping, tooling, and manufacturing industry reveals areas of growth and opportunity, as well as market segments that are experiencing disappointing results. The Wohlers Report 2003 by Wohlers Associates Inc. reflects an industry poised for growth in both technologies and applications, thanks to its emphasis on research and devlopment. The report covers all facets of the industry, including business, product, market, technology, and applications.

“3D printing was a bright spot in 2002,” says Terry Wohlers, the primary author of the report and president of Wohlers Associates. “However, there was a sharp contrast between the sales of 3D printers and conventional rapid prototyping systems.

“A staggering number of R&D; projects are underway around the world, and much of this work is turning into patents and products,” Wohlers adds.

Organizations are now extending the application of RP technology to the production of finished goods. Some believe this practice, termed rapid manufacturing, will rapidly grow and ultimately overshadow the rapid prototyping and rapid tooling markets. The report includes a new section on the opportunities, applications, and benefits of rapid manufacturing, as well as the associated obstacles and considerations.

Packer Technologies Takes Over Technical Agency K+P Agile

Packer Technologies(PTI), a newly created engineering firm, has taken over the management of K+P Agile, a highly respected technical agency that assists design engineers, plastic component users, and manufacturers in the development of cast plastic and metal components. K+P Agile is a wholly owned subsidiary of The Packer Group, a corporation of technology-driven companies that provide a wide range of consulting and technical services and products to manufacturers, industrial processors, utilities, builders and contractors.

PTI provides technical expertise and resources to the metal casting industry. It specializes in reducing costs in development, design and manufacturing. Its expertise encompasses such functions as reverse engineering, rapid prototyping, analysis, testing, and rapid tooling. PTI also provides contract management for all phases in the production cycle.

Router Cutter Optimized for Cavity Milling in Aluminum

Carboloy, part of Seco Tools AB, has added a new high-productivity routing cutterto its range. Optimized for slotting, square shoulder, and pocketing operations in aluminum, the new router cutter is designed to work with an array of different insert nose radii and is available in cylindrical shank, shell mill, and Combimaster two-piece designs.

The new routing cutter offers a high metal removal rate of 185-245 in.³/min. and a minimized runout of 0.0008 in. on a master insert edge. It has a very positive axial rake for good chip evacuation, and tolerances of h6 on the shank and arbor hole. A rake angle of 24° provides a mirror-like surface finish. The cutter is pre-balanced by design for applications running up to 10,000 rpm.

Additional features include constant chip groove along radii, open flute, safety slot, and an optimal ramping angle design that minimizes body weight

Metal Laser Melting

Trumpf, EOS Enter into Cross-License
Agreement on Metal Laser Melting

The TRUMPF Group and EOS have entered into a cross-license agreement with each granting the other party licenses to their patent portfolios for direct metal laser melting, a variation of EOS’s direct metal laser sintering.

In the process of direct metal laser melting, metal powder free of binder or fluxing agent is fully melted by a scanning laser beam to build up three-dimensional objects with properties of the original material. The direct metal laser sintering technology by EOS complements Trumpf’s direct metal laser melting. The new technology of direct metal laser melting is expected to broaden the application of rapid manufacturing.

Hans J. Langer, CEO of EOS, explains: “This agreement is a good example of how patents can be used to benefit innovative manufacturers and also technology users. The investments EOS has made over the years in technical innovation, as well as the acquisition of patent rights, has put us in a position where we can multiply the benefits through cross-licensing.

“For EOS this agreement brings a further strengthening of our technology position by the acquisition of additional patent rights and know-how from TRUMPF. The market benefits from two companies which invest their resources together in developing new and improved technologies.”

Professor Berthold Leibinger, president of Trumpf, says: “The combination of our core competencies in laser and machine tool manufacturing has led to new solutions, constant growth and continuous innovation. In this sense, we are convinced that there is a great market potential for direct metal laser melting.”

Leibinger continues, “By consolidating two already strong patent portfolios this agreement establishes a considerable intellectual property basis from which advanced technologies can be developed.”

Construction to Start Soon on
HYX Technical Center in Shanghai

Construction is slated to begin this October on HYX‘s new Technical Center in Shanghai. The facility, located in the the Waigaoqiao Free Trade Zone of the city’s booming Pudong district, is projected to open in mid-2003. The new center will serve as HYX’s Asia-Pacific headquarters and will complement its existing East Asian technical centers in Sydney, Singapore, and Yokohama.

The state-of-the-art 52,000-ft² facility will offer customers product demonstrations, a bottle development center, PET mold refurbishing, hot runner manufacturing, and spare-parts distribution.

“Shanghai is a strategic location for us, and our new Shanghai Technical Center here will be our Asia hub,” says Marcus Sutch, president of Husky Asia. “It will significantly increase our ability to offer localized service in the region as it moves us physically closer to our key customers.”

Sutch continues, “The Shanghai Technical Center reinforces our commitment to the Asian market. It enhances our ability to keep our customers in the lead by offering the industry’s best service and support.”

Go to
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Selective_laser_melting to know more

CMM Manufacturers

Association of CMM Manufacturers
Celebrates Its First Anniversary

Founded in late 2001 to promote coordinate measuring machine business and technology, the International Association of Coordinate Measuring Machine Manufacturers — better known as CMM 
Manufacturers — will soon be celebrating its first anniversary.

This international, non-profit organization undertakes such initiatives as the development of human skills through education and training, and the promotion and implementation of common standards for hardware and interface software. For example, to help engineers and managers stay up to speed with evolving measurement technology, IA.CMM supports an ongoing forum for the exchange of experience between CMM users and CMM manufacturers. this machine is meaureing the dimensions for molds and die, for examples plastic mold or plastic molding parts

Members of IA.CMM are Brown & Sharpe DEA, Carl Zeiss, ITP, Johansson, Mahr, Mitutoyo, Mora, OKM, Trimek, Wenzel, Werth, and Zett Mess.

New Integrated Resin Selector
Software Tool Is Updated Frequently

Prospector Pro by IDES is a tool to help in the selection of resins. The program integrates with resin manufacturers’ and distributors’ material selector tools and websites. It allows efficient access to a database of 40,000 plastic material datasheets from 390 global suppliers.

The program includes design data, multipoint data, comprehensive datasheets directly from suppliers and sourcing information.

New features include:

  • Exporting of design data to HTML text or MS Excel files
  • Sample ordering via General Polymers
  • Resin purchasing via GE Polymerland
  • Request product quotes from manufacturers and/or distributors

Improved features include complementary material support. If users are unable to find a plastic datasheet, they can contact IDES and it will track down the datasheet within 24 hours.  

An i-Manage Suite™ data entry tool allows manufacturers to import their data directly into the IDES plastic materials database which is updated to Prospector Pro every two weeks.

Materialise Process Builds
Impressive Replica Statue

An impressive statue stands in the hall of the Materialiseheadquarters in Leuven, Belgium. It’s a six-foot-tall reproduction of an ancient Greek kouros, a type of life-size sculpture that marked graves or stood near temples as gifts dedicated to the gods during the Archaic era, from about 650 to 500 BC.

The manufacturer of the statue was part of an ECO project, which involved GEO-Analysis, responsible for scanning sculptures; the Focke Museum in Bremen, Germany; the Fitzwilliam Museum of Archeology in Cambridge, UK; the Archaeological Receipts Fund in Athens; and Materialise.

The goal for Materialise was to make a life-size replica of a kouros. After preparing the scanned data in a day, Materialise built the statue on its Mammoth II stereolithography machine, which has a build area of 2,150 x 620 x 500 mm.

The statue was built with a layer thickness of 0.15 mm. Production took just under 100 hours. The replica has a wall thickness of 5 mm and weighs about 11 kg.

Upcoming NPE 2003 Expected
To Be Truly International Event

We’re less than nine months away from the triennial NPE, and the Washington-based Society of the Plastics Industry is expecting the largest international participation in the show’s history. Show dates are June 23-27, 2003. The year 2000 show set three NPE records: number of exhibiting companies (2,014), net exhibit space (1,142,900 ft²/106,179m²), and number of registered participants (90,142).

By logging on to www.npe.org, visitors can preregister for the show, identify exhibiting companies by product categories and access their websites via links. By late fall, visitors will be able to use the site to select, confirm and pay deposits on hotels.

The site also provides a secure “personal planner,” that preregistered visitors can use to organize their time at NPE 2003. Basic information on the show is available in Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese and Spanish. Links to the city of Chicago websites provide information on dining, recreation and entertainment.

Until December, the cost of registering for NPE is (US) $25.00 and $50.00 thereafter. On-site registration is $75.00.

An International Center at NPE will offer multilingual staff, U.S. Dept. of Commerce trade experts to help visitors make valuable contacts with American firms. Separate meeting areas will be available for delegations from specific countries.

Technology Showroom

Fadal Technology Center Showroom
Schedules Open House for Nov. 19

On November 19, Fadal Machining Centers is holding an open house at its new Technology Center in Hayward, California. The Fadal Technology Center features a showroom with six demo machines and stock machine inventory, as well as a service center that provides multilingual training classes, fully stocked service vans, and factory-trained technicians.

“The Fadal Technology Center enables customers to make the best decision for their application from a wide variety of metal cutting solutions, from entry level to turnkey,” says Jerry McCarty, Fadal Machining Center’s vice president for customer service. “Our 24/7 service means more production time, so Fadal customers get the full value of their machining centers.”

The Fadal Technology Center showroom features six machining centers for demos of Fadal’s Performance Series, Standard Series and Remanufactured Series machining centers, as well as Giddings & Lewis, Hessapp, Hüller Hille, and Cross Hüller machining solutions. By offering machine tools from all the ThyssenKrupp MetalCutting companies, the Fadal Technology center provides a real choice in machining center solutions.

DaimlerChrysler Award Honors
Carl Zeiss Industrial Metrology

Once again, Carl Zeiss Industrial Metrology has received DaimlerChrysler’s International Procurement Services (IPS) award. Dr. Heinrich Reidelbach, IPS vice president at DaimlerChrysler, presented the award to Ralf Dieter, executive vice president and general manager of Carl Zeiss Industrielle Meßtechnik GmbH, in a special ceremony held recently in Stuttgart-Untertürkheim, Germany. Carl Zeiss was one of 10 suppliers to receive the award.

The main criteria for the award were a commitment to quality, competitive pricing, technology, and logistics, as well as a long-standing working relationship between DaimlerChrysler and the supplier. This supplier history was recorded in a “balance score card” along with the four IPS criteria to provide a benchmarking matrix. An additional survey was made in DaimlerChrysler’s factories to obtain feedback on their level of satisfaction with different suppliers.

During the award ceremony, Reidelbach explained that Carl Zeiss Industrial Metrology was a long-standing premium partner in the field of measuring systems and, in particular, had supported DaimlerChrysler during its starting problems with the E-Class car by providing professional and flexible services.

Injection Molding Sevices

A technical center in Mexico City is the latest in a growing number of such facilities for HYX Injection Molding Sevices Ltd. This newest facility opened in September and is situated near a number of key customers. The Mexico Tech Center has 18,000 ft² of production floor space and an overhead crane with a 10-ton capacity.

According to Mike Urquhart, HYX’s vice-president responsible for Latin and South America, the new center gives the company the necessary room to grow.

The Technical Center offers employment for 30 people who will provide a range of services including mold tests, audits, test production runs, and training. A fully equipped PET mold refurbishing area will be another key component of the facility.

Fully operational by March, refurbishing capabilities will include complete cold half conversions, rebuilds and component repair. Hot runner refurbishment along with rebuilds and preventative maintenance will also be available at that time.

If you want to know more informaion from HYX injectioin molding services company? you can got to http://www.abceo.com/ to get more solutions

High Speed Injection Molding

How do you achieve high-speed production of complex parts?

Answer:

The key component is an understanding of the volumes required. If the volumes are a million pieces per year, sometimes a four-cavity mold is needed or a high-quality tool. For high-speed or high-volume production, using high-quality tools is important. The tools should hold up with very little maintenance in this process.

Given a million pieces per year, a four-cavity small part is appropriate. To reduce the price of the parts as much a possible, hot-runner systems are needed to run high-speed molding. These systems eliminate the scrap from production; therefore, the parts are the sole result of the process.

Given five to seven million pieces per year, multi-cavity molds (eight-, sixteen-, twenty-four, thirty-two-cavity molds) are needed. Hot-runner systems and high-volume tools become very important. It is critical money be invested upfront in the development of this process. Based on the performance of these high-speed tools, the costs will be recovered in the future.

How does involving your mold-maker early in the process impact your engineering and development of new plastic molding products?

Answer:

plastic mold

plastic mold

The mold-makers involved in the trade of high-quality tooling must have several years of experience. The majority of mold-makers go through apprenticeship and training programs sponsored by the state.

Not only have they received state certification, they have trained on the production floor. By observing the production staff, mold-makers gain an understanding of the process and the end result of the types of products manufactured. Performance results are obtained during this exercise.

Getting the plastic mold maker engaged in the beginning also brings up a lot of ideas and develops the thought process for production. Based on their years of experience, it can be systematically determined how to produce high-quality tools with a very small margin of error in molding.

This lends itself to the best product possible with the least amount of down time. It incorporates the types of steels used, the types of molds used, as well as the types of engineering required. Any aspect of the process is accentuated by the experience of the mold-makers and their recommendations. It is crucial they be consulted at the very beginning of product development.

How do you move tools from overseas or execute mold transfers?

Answer:

When transferring plastic molds from overseas, the best practice is to find a facility that has an in-house tooling capability. It is important the facility is able to accomplish large-scale repairs on molds. Therefore, the skills required for execution are available within the company itself.

Since the company receiving the tools or the mold transfer is highly trained, the tools are sent there to be taken apart and examined. This step in the transfer process allows the manufacturer to assess if the tools were properly built. In numerous cases, tools are shipped with a combination of U.S. and European (metrics) supplies mixed together within the same molds.

These are some of the issues that need to be addressed to ensure proper procedures are taken to straighten the tool out. Otherwise, it cannot be made into a moldable product. Another concern is standardization of the molds. The molds should run in standard molding machines built for the industry.

The type of material needed to run in a particular plastic mold – engineering or otherwise – must be a consideration as well. The molds must be capable of meeting the volumes required for the materials involved. Some tools may not have the capacity to run the necessary volumes for the entire duration of the process.

A lot of tooling that comes from overseas may be prototype, not production tooling. The type of steel or engineering used during production may not be standardized or in line with manufacturer expectations. Prototype tools are not designed for high-volume production. It is important the tools are assessed properly.

What are the best practices in new product mold design?

Answer:

After product development has been secured and generation of plastic parts has begun, the best practice is to have those plastic parts designed by an expert. Generally, this would be a trained plastics engineer specializing in the various aspects of the process: tooling, molding, and plastics.

The engineer reviews the product line to confirm the plastic parts are moldable, the material used is appropriate, and the types of machines required. The results of the engineer’s assessment can be interpreted as to whether the product line is capable of being molded or not.

In order to save costs on the front end, work with a plastics engineer that specializes in tooling and molding. Based on this expert opinion, the feasibility of the product line may be determined.